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, but often charge 5 times more than public college. the kodak company is clicking with its bond investors to get out of bankruptcy. according to the wall street journal, the iconic photography giant has reached a deal with bond holders at jpmorgan chase and centerbridge partners. kodak would recieve $793 million in loans on the condition it gets $500 million by selling its patent portfolio, perphaps to goole or apple. the deal needs court approval, and there's no comment from kodak. within the next three weeks, one variable that's kept american airlines in bankruptcy may be resolved. the airline and its pilots' union have reached a tentative agreement that gives the pilots pay raises and a 13.5% stake in the company. a ratification vote by american's 7500 pilots comes next. the labor agreement underscores a need to avert a rapidly approaching pilot shortage as a result of mandatory retirement and increased flight experience required of new pilots. "they simply haven't had the hiring they need to keep up. pretty soon, smaller airlines, private jet companies and others are going to be poach
local food banks. >> business news now. fcc putting pressure on google and is kodak getting out of bankruptcy? after the b!mx cj% ftc turning up heat on google. bloomberg news learned ftc demanding google resolve an antitrust case against it within days or face a lawsuit. you might recall ftc has been a year and a half over whether the company uses dominance in the internet search to hurt competition two. sources tell us google has been talks for a couple weeks but not proposed any prem rem dis to alleged violations. kodak moving close twror getting out of bankruptcy arks ranging $793 million in financing from creditors that is8>)Ñ contingent on kodak sellg it's patent fort folo resolving the company's uk pension and other issues kodak says it's hoping to get out of bankruptcy next year. m sm tech angles to a resale story, best buy names sharon mccoll yum as its new chief financial officer, she helped develop e commerce business and best buy is hoping the improved online sails will help turn around this struggling kchl a dark cloud hanging over the new e. ceo of "new york times
hiring more workers. eastman kodak won court approval to cut benefits for 56,000 retirees as part of its chapter 11 restructuring. it will mean $10 million in savings. retirees and medicare recipients fear the loss of benefits, but kodak says the move is legal. by the end of the year, worldwide layoffs at the company will reach 4,000 workers. a weight-loss drug is losing support. pharma company vivus says its weight-loss drug qsymia does not have enough support from insurers, and that is forcing nearly one in five patients to say no to the drug. vivus reports in the third quarter the drug generated only $41,000, down substantially from the $310,000 projected. shares fell 26% yesterday, closing near 11 dollars. in july, shares hit a 15-year high of 31 dollars. in earnings news, aol posted a 7% increase in profits, mostly from ad sales. it's the biggest gain in months. the company expects further growth in 2013. sales fell 11% at express scripts. the prescription company blames overly aggressive estimates and the economy for an earnings miss. office depot and office max had slow third qu
of the country. he was the head of this project. 1939 when kodak had a color film, he had his photographers tried out. kodak was trying to estimate was a new market, a new product, and they wanted people who knew how to use it effectively to try it out and publicize it. >> american artifacts, sunday at 7:00 p.m. eastern on american history tv. >> harry reid end of the democratic leaders briefed reporters on negotiations on the fiscal cliff compromise. lawmakers have until december to negotiate a deal that would avert the tax decreases that would affect in january. this is 20 minutes. >> i had a nice meeting a separate that are this morning. i always enjoyed meeting with him. democrats are on the same page. freezing the texas for the first for. letting the rich go up to the sum of aware for the clinton cabinet permission. republicans know where we stand. we have said it so many times. it has been at least two weeks since met at the warehouse. now is the time for republicans to move past the happy talk. to put specifics of the table. the president made his proposal. we need a proposal from him. the
. like the old kodak film, kids are like that. all they need is a little exposure. once they get exposed, the picture comes into view for them. curiosity has to be with living in an environment where you get exposed and your curiosity grows and you can channel that sort of curiosity. the kids that succeed are curious because that curiosity is encouraged. >> i take your point, but i think it goes beyond simple economics, kids can be curious about a couple of blocks. you don't need complicated toys to be curious. to me, it is much more about the environment. there are lots of parents that are encouraging their kids ask questions. that is what built curiosity more than anything else. tavis: no matter how carias i might be, if my situation means i never get outside of these blocks, how does curiosity get for the rest? >> i think there is no question that there are different opportunities when they come from different economic backgrounds. curiosity transcends that more. i will absolutely take the point. there are different kinds of opportunities. tavis: since when is the power of character h
, who was an economist from columbia university, he was the head of this project, and in 1939 when kodak introduced color film, they sent film to roy stryker to have his photographers try out, to see what they could do. kodak was trying to establish a new market, a new product and they wanted people who would know how to use it effectively to try it out and publicize it. >> america of the 1930's and 1940's comes to life through the eye of the camera as the library of congress curator beverly brennan shares some of the 1,600 color photographs taken during the depression and world war ii. "american artifacts," sunday at 7:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m. eastern. part of american history tv this weekend on c-span 33. >> we had 2000 flight officers or generals. today we have 1000 flag officers and generals. the ratio is totally out of whack. wheels have an animal for every ship in the navy -- we almost have an admiral for every ship in the navy. we could transform responsibilities out of the pentagon and consolidate programs and save a significant amount of money. >> you can talk with tom coburn abou
. >> kodak reached a financing deal to take it out of bankruptcy. it would allow them to borrow $793 million and sell its patent fort you'll to for $500 million. it needs bankruptcy approval. they filed for bankruptcy protection in january while struggling to compete with the digital photography industry. >>> this 56 year old grandmother is not someone to be messed with. what she fought off with her bare hands and an axe. >> they come from thousands of miles away and pay a lot to go to college. where they are coming from. and you live way up here. brian, your cousin, he's a little bit older than you, he lives here, in chicago. and your aunt lisa lives here, in baltimore. uncle earnie? waaay out in hawaii. but don't you worry, we will always be together for christmas. [ male announcer ] being together is the best part of the holidays and cheerios is happy to be part of the family. you just ate dallas! i wish i had u-verse when i was your age. in my day, we didn't have these fancy wireless receivers. blah blah blah. if i had a sleepover, i couldn't just move the tv into the playroom. no. we ha
and kodak because they had their head offices in his home district. they wanted a tax shelter for retirement payments to executives. that's how it started. they wrote it. it was 401(k) because it's 401 provisions down in the tax code. it was so small nobody knew it was there. you guys didn't know it was there. >> instead of having a solid pension with a guaranteed annuity coming to you, you have 401(k)s which have shrunk in many cases over the years. >> what you got is hundreds of billions of dollars of expenditures are shifted from the corporate books into the pocketbooks and wallets of ordinary people. it's a disaster. the average 401(k) balance today is $18,000. the median 401(k) balance for people on the verge of retirement after 20 years in the 401(k), is only $85,000. the corporations saved enormous amounts of money and the people are having to spend a lot more money and not saving enough. >> we have to have you back again and again. this is great stuff. a lot of our progressive viewers don't know the details. thank you so much. they know the squeeze is real. rick smith, the book is ca
. yes, polaroid, kodak, okay. research in motion, nokia. how about radioshack, right? radioshack, that was a good one. or supervalu. all the way down we were told that long-term you're fine. or in other words, being a long-term investor doesn't give you a license to be a lazy and apathetic investor. as anyone who owns stocks through the misery and horror of the crash in 2008 and the beginning of 2009 knows it doesn't work. investing for the long-term does not mean owning stockses forever. if one thing the crash did, it disabused people that you can hold stocks for eternity and somehow magically bank of america comes back to 50. as long as you don't pay attention too hard, i get it. still, from the stories i read and from pundits, the lessons are already being forgotten. and i can't have that happen, not on my "mad money" watch. i've always been one of the loudest opponents of buy and hold. in this brave you world of euro meltdowns, men who espouse this philosophy have tried to change their tune or they've been discredited that no one listens to them anywhere. it doesn't mean you
labs, became like kodak. the patents, they got millions of them. all those nobel prize winners. the patents are for equipment that became obsolete years ago. you could have been a buyer of alcatel lucent all the way down. there so many reasons to do so. i mean, just as there are with nokia or research in motion or hewlett-packard. we hear them every day. there's value all over the place. when you get in the downward death spiral, it's impossible to break out of. the only one i've seen rescued in this ever ra ra is sprint. one last thing. throughout this period, many thought lucent and then lucent alcatel had to make it. some still do. the market says it won't. i think the market's right. stick with cramer. >>> taking control of your financial destiny is smart. why would you go it alone? >> something that has a much larger bearing on you and the stock market as a whole. >> let cramer be your guide. your sounding board. >> i'm having a hard time with my favorite stock. >> i know you can beat these professionals. >> and your coach on the road to financial independence. "mad money"
'll find batteries that look like duracell, even if they're called dinacell or super-cell. kodak film is popular. so are gillette razors and mickey. 100% genuine? maybe not. the chinese are addicted to brand names, even if they don't always know how to spell them. with the help of kroll investigators, we found a counterfeiter who took us to her garage in yiwu, where she displayed western running shoes ready to be copied. we wondered how long it would take to make copies of these nikes. >> [speaking foreign language] >> ten days. >> ten days. 1,000 shoes at $4 a pair. was she afraid of the police? not at all. "we have a good relationship with the cops," she said. and what do the chief cops in beijing say? we spoke to gao feng, deputy head of china's anti-counterfeiting police unit. from what we've seen, sir, counterfeiting is tolerated. obviously the authorities know about this, and yet, the shopping mall is open, the markets are open. >> [speaking foreign language] >> this phenomenon does exist. i admit its existence, but there's a question of how hard you crack down. that's because,
of this project and in 1939 when kodak introduced colored film, they sent film to roy stryker to have his photographers tryout and see what they could do. kodak was trying to establish a new market and product and they wanted people who would know how to use it effectively to try it out and publicize it. >> deputy secretary of state bill burns and special envoy for middle east peace david hale spoke with palestinian president mahmoud abbas in new york city to discuss thursday's vote in the united nations to elevate palestine to be a nonmember observer state. this is 10 minutes. >> lets start with your incredibly successful effort to lobby other countries not in favor of palestinians. it was a resolution at the u.n. not only that but also your attempt to the secret diplomacy by sending, stealthily sending deputy secretary of state of boston new york. you know, what exactly did he want to get from abbas and did he get it, because it was very clear it's certain that they're going ahead. >> well first of all there was nothing secret about the deputy secretary's trip to new york to see preside
columbia university, he was the head of this project, and in 1939 when kodak introduced color film, they sent film to roy striker to have his photographers try out, to see what they could do. kodak was trying to establish a new market, a new product and they wanted people who would know how to use it effectively to try it out and publicize it. >> america of the 1930's and 40's comes to life through the eye of the camera as they share some of the 1,600 color photographs taken during the depression and world war ii. sundays at 7:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m. eastern. part of american history tv this weekend on c-span 3. >> on 16 or 17 bases in the united states, we have military-run schools. the average cost to educate a child in that school per year is $50,000. almost four times what the rest of public education costs. and the vast majority of our basis, we use public schools. we could take the money we're spending today, pay every public school system $14,000 per child, and save billions of dollars per year. and with the same or better outcomes. >> this weekend, you can talk with oklahoma
university. he was the head of the project. in 1939, when kodak instituted color from, they sent on to him to have his photographers try it out. kodak was trying to establish a new market for products and wanted people who would know how to use it effectively to try it out and publicize it. >> america of the 1930's and 1940's comes to life as the library of congress curator shares some of the 1500 color photographs taken during the depression and world war ii. sunday at 7:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m. eastern, part of american history tv on c-span 3. >> on capitol hill today, a lot of events and briefings happening relating to the fiscal cliff negotiations. coming up in half an hour we begin to show you the remarks from congressional leaders on where things currently stand. we start with house speaker john boehner. also house minority leader nancy pelosi and senate democratic leader harry reid. that starts at 8:00 p.m. eastern. tomorrow on "washington journal," a congressional historian gives the history of the filibuster rule and the changes senate leader reid is pursuing. then a guest from poli
, take a look at this kodak moment. tony perkins caught on the slide himself. and i understand he screamed like a girl. >> that is not true. >> we're going to have more coming up in our next hour. >> that's a good one. >> i loved it. i did not scream like a girl. thank you, holly. >> that's pretty cute. >> coming up, most of us like to hear we look good for our age. there's a reason to be concerned if you look older than you actually are. >> and watch the salt. some of our favorite foods contain way too much sodium and you might not even know it. the fox medical team takes a look at the sneaky 6. we'll be right back. time right now 7 :57.  >>> this is fox 5 morning news. >> straight ahead at 8:00, the count down to the fiscal cliff. we will take a closer look at the negotiations and later sit down with an expert for what could happen to your money if congress and the white house can't reach a deal. >> a number of investigations into that u.s. could so late attack -- consulate attack. we'll have more on that coming up. >> and later, energy overload. that
to kodak moment. dc's photo week coming up. how you too could take advantage of this amazing opportunity. plus, maybe we'll get a tip or two about how you can have a better eye yourself when you are behind the lens. all live next on fox 5 morning news. stay with us. >> closed captioning brought to you by this year, america's privately-y-owned freight railroads plan to spend $23 billion on their network. that's like building 4 nat's stadiums, 5 wilson bridges, and 8 dc convention centers...all in one year. and not a penny of it comes from taxpayers. [ male announcer ] from our nation's networks... ♪ ...to our city streets... ♪ ...to skies around the world... ♪ ...northrop grumman's security solutions are invisibly at work, northrop grumman. freight railroads plan to spend $23 billion on their network. that's like launching 4 mars rovers, 10 gps satellites, and 20 space shuttles ...all in one year. and not a penny of it comes from taxpayers. >>> welcome back to fox 5 morning news. today we say hello to our facebook fan of the day. who is jerico. thank you so much for watching. >>> p
university. he was the head of this project. in 1939, when kodak introduced color film, they sent him to have his photographers try out, see what they could do. kodak was trying to establish a new market and product, and they wanted people who would know how to use it effectively to try it out and publicize it. >> america in the 1930's and 1940's -- the library of congress curator shares some of the 1600 color photographs taken during the depression and world war ii. .nday at 7:00 p.m. on 3. -- c-span 3. >> now, john boehner and house republican leaders talk about fiscal cliff negotiations. he says he is optimistic a deal can be reached with the president. >> morning, everyone. going over the fiscal cliff will hurt our economy and will her job creation in our country. republicans are committed to continuing to work with the president to come to an agreement to avert the so-called fiscal clef. one reason why we believe that we put revenue on the table as long as it is accompanied by serious spending cuts to avert a crisis. we believe this is the president's request for a balanced approach to t
university. the head of this project -- in 1939, when kodak introduced color from, they introduced it to him to have his photographers try it out and see what they could do. kodak was trying to establish a new market and they wanted people who would know how to use it effectively to try it out and publicize it. >> america of the 1930's and 1940's comes to life through the eye of the camera as a library of congress curator shares some of the 1600 color photographs taken during the depression and world war ii. sunday at 7:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m. eastern this weekend on c- span 3. >> secretary of state hillary clinton spoke thursday about the future of u.s. foreign policy. the syrian civil war, and other challenges facing the middle east. this came at a forum hosted by "foreign-policy" magazine. she also answer questions. this is an hour. [applause] >> madam secretary, today we solve all your problems. nothing left to worry about, really. actually, the office of policy planning and the foreign policy group made a bet we could bring together leaders from inside government from leaders outside gov
appreciation for those who worked so hard to get him reelected. john boehner will cry the a kodak commercial. >> you can understand he needed some sort of relief. ana, the president has presented a different face today, this afternoon, when he talks about the economy. what must the president say in your mind? >> first of all, carol, i'm not sure that showing you can cry is not a very good tactic when you're about to go negotiate with john boehner, who is known for being the cry baby in congress. that's kind of part of his personality. it's a good thing they both come in, knowing that they can cry. what does he have to say? i think he has to reassure the american people he has been getting a lot of olive branches thrown to him by john boehner basically saying, look, we want to deal. we want to cooperate. we got the message. we understand we need to compromise. there are certain things i can't do but there are certain things i will do and many willing to do. i'm reasonable, responsible. come deal with me. i think the president will talk about the economy. i think he's going to talk about the i
it is a level playing field. host: you put a reference to kodak but wasn't that technology train -- changing? are you saying that the chinese people are taking jobs away from americans in terms of photo processing? caller: in general all jobs, china is taking jobs from america. guest: to really discuss this issue, you have to look at the broader context of globalization over the last 10-15 years. for the last decade, china has built a formidable export sector. it is clear that china had 600 million laborers that want to get jobs and they flocked to the cities and i built these huge export hubs. it is not a surprise that when people searched for lower-cost labor, there was a supply there. i think channel tends to frown on certain trading rules. that is something beijing and washington will continue to discuss and washington will continue to push china on adhering to these trade rules. the currency issue is not that big of an issue anymore for u.s. companies. the bigger issue is how to continue to access markets in china. host: you look at the new brahmi's up election -- the new burmese opposi
and one that these kaurts hear a lot. faking a look at some recent bankruptcies, kodak, attempting to pay investors $8.9 million and beech craft, an ongoing situation. a 3.5 million dlrsz payout for its executives. what do you think about it guys? 1.75 million, that's $7,000 a week for a company that won't be on the docket. >> the pending home saeles inde from the national retailers, september was also revised higher and the realtor's index is now 13.2% above october of 0 2011. this is the highest level for the index which measures signed contracts not closings since march of 2007 and on a year over year basis, the index has now been rising for 18 consecutive months. the rocket is no thhe activity region to region, the northeast which realtors say did receive some impact from hurricane sandy, was essentially flat with sales down.01%. in the west where investors continue to devour the home market. >> we should point out, diana, on those good numbers and of course not the only good numbers we have got this week, the s&p has gone positive for the month. the flat line 1412, and we're well ab
be caught anywhere. there were editorials in the 1880s that said have you seen the kodak film, which can get you in a bad position of the post office. but instead of saying get over it, many state laws about privacy. when supreme court dealt with the case about gps, the supreme court didn't say, hey, we have technology, get over privacy, they said -- and this is a supreme court that doesn't agree on anything, they said privacy is important. something even this minor is where you are to give away information about whether you know it or not abortion clinic, a competitor to your bosses, this information is being tracked on the web through smart phones actually have huge ramifications. it's what we do? in europe, they actually have protective laws. you can find out what data aggregators are talking about you, if you have wrong information, you can correct it. so i might be googling diabetes or a friend or a product, and not for, it doesn't mean that i'm unhealthy, but the federal trade commission is actually considering having a do not track regulation. sort of like the do not call list. i will
. kodak and watch those games. -- go back and watch those games. was there a penalty hit? were all those solid and hard making a reptilian brain jump? they were. go back and watch. i present to you is changing. james harrison said publicly he would avoid hitting the quarterback in the head. >> and that is big. >> i will probably get in trouble, but anecdotal is not approve, but those stories also exist. those hard hits can be done and continue to encourage the following of the fans and those of us that enjoy it. that does exist. >> we need to wrap up. but with love to get to everyone at the table. -- i would love to get to everyone at the table. quick closing comments from scott and then bob. >> i want to comment on the idea that getting players engaged is important. this is not an advertisement. i have to be careful. with the pilot programs, one thing that was really beneficial is the alumni players came out. they were genuinely presenting their feelings about the game. they were talking openly to parents. it made a real difference. one point you made it is how we come together and get
in 1939 when kodak introduced color film, they send found to have his photographers try out to see what they could do. trying this new market and it wanted people who could use it effectively to try it out and publicize it. >> the library of congress curator shares some of the color photographs taken during the depression and world war ii. sunday at 7:00 p.m. and it 10:00 p.m. eastern this weekend on c- span3. >> earlier today, president obama visited in manufacturing the facility in pennsylvania. ♪ this is about 25 minutes. >> good morning, everybody. please have a seat. have a seat. relax for a second. it is good to see all of you. hello. it is good to be back in pennsylvania. and eight is good to be right here -- and it is good to be right here. i want to thank michael, robert, and the investor, joe glickman for hosting me today and giving me a great tour. stand up so everybody can see you guys. [cheers and applause] there you go. we have a couple of the outstanding members of congress here. [cheers and applause] now, i'd just finished getting a tour of the workshop. i have to say
university, he was the head of this project, and in 1939 when kodak introduce color film, they said film to roy stryker to have his photographers try out. see what they could do. kodak was trying to establish a new market, new product and they wanted people who would know how to use it effectively. to try it out and publicize it. >> america of the 1930s and '40s comes to life to the eye of the camera as library of congress curator shares some of the 1600 were photographs taken during the depression and world war ii. american artifacts sunday at 7 p.m. and 10 p.m. eastern. part of american history tv this weekend on c-span3. >> the u.s. senate is about to is about the gavel and. senators hold today to finish up debate and votes on the 2013 defense spending and programs built a this is expected to take votes immediately after cabin entity. a vote is possible for later today. now to live coverage of the u.s. senate here on c-span2. the presiding officer: the senate will come to order. the chaplain, dr. barry black, will lead the senate in prayer. the chaplain: let us pray. o god, you are th
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)

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